Review Essays

Humanity is dedicated to the publication of incisive review essays on recent scholarly books on human rights, humanitarianism, and development in the modern and contemporary world. These essays usually bring together more than one monograph, exploring them in comparison, while also placing them in their larger scholarly framework, and sustain their discussion for at least 5000 words. For an example, please see Pamela Beth Harris’ recent essay on Stephen Hopgood’s The Endtimes of Human Rights and Alison Brysk’s Speaking Rights to Power.

If you are interested in contributing a review-essay to Humanity, please submit a one-page proposal about the set of books you would like to review, selected from the list below via e-mail. Your proposal should explain the approach or framework you plan to bring to your review.


Books for review

Fellmeth, Aaron. Paradigms of International Human Rights Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Gunneflo, Marcus. Targeted Killing: A Legal and Political History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016.

Hoover, Joe. Reconstructing Human Rights: A Pragmatist and Pluralist Inquiry into Global Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Moniz, Amanda B. From Empire to Humanity: The American Revolution and the Origins of Humanitarianism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Nowak, Manfred. Human Rights or Global Capitalism: The Limits of Privatization. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.

Porter, Stephen R. Benevolent Empire: U.S. Power, Humanitarianism, and the World’s Dispossessed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016.

Stamatov, Peter. The Origins of Global Humanitarianism: Religion, Empires, and Advocacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015.

Yamin, Alicia Ely. Power, Suffering, and the Struggle for Dignity: Human Rights Frameworks for Health and Why They Matter. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.

Print Friendly