Featured Story

Gunnar and Alva Myrdal 1970. Authenticated News/Archive Photos/Getty Images. Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal’s major works are the subject of this issue’s dossier. Our featured article is the introduction to the dossier written by Maribel Morey and Jamie Martin.

Introduction

To find the practical formulas for this never-ending reconstruction of society is the supreme task of social science. The world catastrophe places tremendous difficulties in our way and may shake our confidence to the depths. Yet we have today in social science a greater trust in the improvability of man and society than we have ever had since the Enlightenment. —Gunnar Myrdal, An American Dilemma (1944) Gunnar Myrdal (1898–1987) was the twentieth century’s most influential social democratic internationalist.1 Throughout his long career—first as economist, then Read More »

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