Featured Story

Ifo camp periphery, Dadaab, Kenya, 2011. Photo by and courtesy of Anooradha Iyer Siddiqi. The centerpiece of our new issue is an exciting dossier on contemporary refugee timespaces, starting out with our featured story: a preface by Angela Naimou.

Preface

As the name for one who flees (fugere) from danger to a space of protection, the term refugee names a specific position in space and time: a past emergency leads to a dislocated present under the threat of harm, propelling one’s flight to find refuge toward a future elsewhere. Its shadow is not only the term migrant but also fugitive, one who flees from the law, a reminder that persons move and are moved between regimes of legality and illegality.1 Under the names of asylum Read More »

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