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A group of men stand behind a micrphone. One holds up a book with the word "Constitution" in portuguese on the front cover.

Ulysses Guimaraes and the Brazilian Constitution of 1988. Agência Brasil, Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0.)

Our featured article by Amy Kapczinski considers the right to medicine in the neoliberal age, using Brazil as one of her case studies. The 1988 Brazilian Constitution proclaims health as a fundamental social right.

The Right to Medicines in an Age of Neoliberalism

Abstract: Has the human rights movement helped entrench neoliberalism? Could it help displace it? This article analyzes “right to medicines” cases, arguing that human rights, even in “socioeconomic” form, can intensify inequality and reproduce neoliberal logics, where they are simply overlain upon the existing political economy. But other versions of human rights are possible too. By tracing the efforts of access to medicines groups to link the right to health to reforms of local and global intellectual property laws, I explore a form of human Read More »

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