Featured Story

Kawahara Keiga: Siebold with his Japanese lover and baby-daughter Kusumoto Ine watching how rowing boats tow a Dutch ship into Nagasaki harbour, 1823-1829. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Our featured article is Valeska Huber and Jan C. Jansen’s introduction to a dossier on nineteenth-century cosmopolitanism, edited by Valeska Huber, Jan C. Jansen, and Martin Rempe. Huber and Jansen present cosmopolitanism through the historical prism of the Age of Empire in order to consider multiple conceptions of world citizenship and provide a framework for dealing with difference in the present.

Dealing with Difference: Cosmopolitanism in the Nineteenth-Century World of Empires

Abstract: Arguing that cosmopolitan ideas and practices have to be included in a joint matrix, this introduction puts emphasis on the situatedness of cosmopolitanism in specific periods, regions, and political contexts. It highlights nineteenth-century empires as central frameworks and breeding grounds of cosmopolitanism and identifies imperial and anti-imperial thinking as crucial to various conceptions of world citizenship. The introduction points to the campaigning for and enactment of rights and to the related conceptions of humanity as crucial elements of nineteenth-century cosmopolitanism. Seeing cosmopolitanism through the Read More »

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