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A sixteenth century etching depicting allegorical representations of wealth and poverty.

Christoph Murer, An Allegory of a Rich Man and a Poor Man, 1596. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Phyllis Massar, 2011.

Our featured essay by Daniel Brinks, Julia Dehm, and Karen Engle introduces a dossier on human rights and economic inequality; it considers the extent to which human rights do, can, or should attend to economic inequality.

Introduction: Human Rights and Economic Inequality

Abstract: The introduction situates this dossier on “Human Rights and Inequality” within broader scholarly and policy debates about the relationship between human rights and economic inequality, specifically about the extent to which human rights do, can, or should attend to economic inequality. It draws out the key arguments of each of the contributions and puts them in conversation with one another by describing the different strands and traditions of human rights scholarship and practice with which the various authors engage. Along the way, the introduction Read More »

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